Menasce synagogue is added to Egypt’s heritage list

 The Egyptian government’s decision, announced in Al-Ahram online, to classify the Menasce synagogue as ‘national heritage’ is welcome. It means that it will be obligated to preserve and protect the building at its expense, ending the sort of wrangles that we have seen recently over who should pay for repairs to the Eliyahu Hanavi synagogue, for instance. (With thanks: Boruch)

Antiquities officials have decided to add the Menasce Synagogue in
Alexandria to the national heritage list of Islamic, Coptic and Jewish
monuments.

According to Mohammed Metwali, general director of antiquities in
Alexandria, the synagogue was built by philanthropist Baron Yacoub de
Menasce in 1860.

The decision by the Supreme Council of Antiquities’ board of directors
comes after inspection and investigation of the synagogue’s
architectural and archaeological conditions.

Mohamed Abdel-Latif, a deputy minister of antiquities and head of the
Islamic, Coptic and Jewish Antiquities Department within the ministry,
told Ahram Online that the decision came within the framework of the
ministry’s keenness to add all Egyptian monuments to the country’s
heritage list, regardless of era or religious affiliation.

“All the monuments, whether ancient Egyptian, Jewish, Coptic, Islamic,
on Egyptian land are the country’s properties and unique heritage,” he
said.

Abdel-Latif explained that the registration of the synagogue, which is
located in El-Manshia Square, will make it an official historical site
under the antiquities protection law, law no. 117 of 1983, and under its
amendments in law no. 3 of 2010.

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This website is dedicated to preserving the memory of the near-extinct Jewish communities, of the Middle East and North Africa, documenting the stories of the Jewish refugees and their current struggle for recognition and restitution.

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