Tunisian Jew stabbed on Djerba

 With thanks: Ahuva

The Al-Griba synagogue, Djerba, a main focus for the Tunisian tourist industry. 

A Tunisian Jew has been treated in hospital on the Tunisian island of Djerba after being stabbed.

The Israeli medium Alyaexpress.com, quoting the Tunisian Ministry of the Interior, reports that the man’s assailant has been arrested. According to the preliminary investigation, ‘there is no political or religious motive’.

Lassad Tounsi, 38, attacked Maurice El-Bchiri, a merchant from the main area of Jewish settlement, the Hara Kbira, with a blunt tool, and stabbed him in several places.

Sources have described Tounsi as a ‘religious extremist’.

The incident has not yet been confirmed or widely reported.

Djerba is an important centre for the Tunisian tourist industry. In the run-up to the yearly Lag Ba’Omer pilgrimage to the Al-Ghriba synagogue, which would attract thousands of Jewish tourists in a few weeks’ time, the authorities would be understandably anxious to play down any antisemitic motive.

Read report in full

3 Comments

  • No, it's completely different. In the United States, a murder based on religious/racial hatred would be universally condemned. This man will be a hero in Tunisia.

    It's time to remove the mask from this farce of Muslim-Jewish "coexistence" in Tunisia. If Jews used the same tactics as the pro-Palestinian movement, the world would be shocked at the apartheid conditions we live under (and always have lived under) in Arab countries.

    Reply
  • Sultana is right. The murderer was an old KKKlansman, an old Nazi. Even in the USA it happens. So America is not entirely different.

    Reply

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