Israeli officials fear for safety of Tunisian Jews

 Salafists chanting slogans (Photo: AFP)

Israeli officials have expressed serious concerns over the safety of
the Jewish community in Tunisia, Arutz Sheva reports. Has Tunisia reached the point of no return? 

Some 2,000 Jews still live in the
country, and the Foreign Ministry’s office for fighting anti-Semitism
said that instability in the country could have serious negative effects
on the country’s Jews.

The recent murder of leftist opposition
leader Chokri Belaid has brought hundreds of thousands of angry
Tunisians out into the streets, as popular opposition to the country’s
Islamist regime grows.  The unrest (…) could be a recipe for
attacks on Jews, the Foreign Ministry said.

Public declarations of anti-Semitism, in social media and traditional
media, have risen significantly in recent days, the Ministry said. In
addition, local imams in mosques have been inciting against Jews,
claiming that they are responsible for the liberal opposition to the
Islamist Ennahda party, which runs the country.

Several Jewish cemeteries
in Tunisia were desecrated this past week, local residents reported.
Many residents are living behind locked doors out of fear that pogroms
could evolve.

The Foreign Ministry has instructed
Israeli diplomats around the world to ask the governments of the
countries where they are stationed to intervene with the Tunisian
government to ensure the safety of the country’s Jews.

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2 Comments

  • That was not unique. But not many kept that paper, so it's a rariity and should be kept preciously for proof. There will come a day when this too will be denied just as some deny the Haulocost
    Sultana

    Reply

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